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Financial Assistance with Veterinary Care

Financial Assistance with Pet Care Costs 

National Programs

Everyone knows that vet care is expensive, but there are organizations that try to help lower

income folks when their pet needs medical treatment.  It’s hard to guess how successful

applications to these groups will be, but it’s worth looking into.

American Animal Hospital Association

The AAHA Helping Pets Fund provides financial assistance through AAHA-accredited veterinary

practices for emergency and non-elective veterinary care.  They can help in 3 types of cases:

1) When a pet owner is receiving certain forms of government assistance for low-income

individuals   2) When a pet owner experiences a temporary financial hardship  3)  When a

veterinary practice  acts as a Good Samaritan and no pet owner exists.  All applications

must come through a AAHA accredited veterinary practice on behalf of the pet in need.

Assistance is limited to $700 per AAHA-accredited practice.  The maximum available

to each family is $500 per year and $1000 lifetime.

http://www.aahahelpingpets.org/how_it_works.html

The Pet Fund

The Pet Fund only funds non-basic, non-emergency care.  This includes medical care that is

above and beyond basic care, but which does not require urgent treatment.  There is a

chronic waiting list for funding, but application instructions and other details can be

found at:      http://thepetfund.com/application/

Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance Program

This is a nonprofit 501(c) (3) organization that provides financial assistance to cat and kitten

guardians who are unable to afford veterinary services to save their companions when

life-threatening illness or injury strikes.  Seniors, people with disabilities, people who have

lost their jobs, Good Samaritans who rescue a cat are some of those who might need this

kind of help.  Further information at: http://www.fveap.org/sys-tmpl/door/

IMOM (In Memory of Magic) Helping People Help Pets

IMOM assists with the cost of veterinary care for life threatening emergencies defined as:

when a veterinarian confirms in writing that your pet will die or have to be humanely

euthanized if care is not provided within five days from the date of diagnosis. Due to

limited resources, IMOM can help only with one-time care if your application is approved.

Follow up and after care will be the pet owner’s responsibility.  There are several steps in

the application process, beginning with applying for Care Credit.      http://www.imom.org/

Red Rover was United Animals Nations

http://www.redrover.org/node/1198

Cats in Crisis

… awards small grants ($100-$200) to assist pet owners in the care of cats with certain

medical conditions (diabetes, heart, thyroid, movement, neurological).  Recipients

must document low income.    http://www.catsincrisis.org/index.html

Help-a-Pet

http://www.help-a-pet.org/

Brown Dog Foundation

http://www.browndogfoundation.org/  Most assistance goes to those in Tennessee where the foundation is located.

 Ashley’s Angel Fund

http://www.ashleyfund.org/

The Mosby Foundation

The Mosby Foundation is a charity organized to assist in the care of sick, injured,

abused and neglected dogs through financial support and public education.  Priority

for accepting an application for funding will be a life-saving emergency confirmed

by a licensed veterinarian either by fax or phone.

http://themosbyfoundation.org/what.html

Magic Bullet Fund

Magic Bullet Fund (MBF) provides financial assistance for canine cancer treatment only

when the family is financially unable to provide treatment. Most families contribute

some portion of the treatment fees and MBF contributes only the amount that the family

cannot pay.  MBF accepts cases for which we can reasonably hope that treatment will

add a year of high quality life for a dog.

http://www.themagicbulletfund.org/Apply.shtml

Big Hearts Fund

The Big Hearts Fund helps owners of cats and dogs with heart disease (not related to aging) to pay for cardiac veterinary care.  It also offers information on heart disease in animals.  Owners income must be under 400%  of the poverty level to apply.   http://bigheartsfund.org/about/

Labmed

… provides financial aid for rescued Labrador Retrievers and Lab mixes who are injured  or ill.      http://www.labmed.org/

Harley’s Hope Foundation,  Colorado Springs, CO     Assistance for emergency/major veterinary care or behavioral training for pets of low and fixed income pet guardians.      www.harleys-hopefoundation.org.   The Pet Assistance Fund and Service Animal Aid Fund are offered nationwide.

Frankie’s Friends

http://www.frankiesfriends.com/about/finding-cures-saving-pets/

The Thaddeus Bear Fund for cancer     http://www.thaddeusbearfund.info/

Companion Bridge      Posts stories of pets in need to ask for donations of any size to help the animal.          http://companionbridge.org/

 

Here is the financial assistance resource list of  the Humane Society of the US:   http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/trouble_affording_pet.html

Additional sources of financial assistance  can be found on these lists:

National organizations        http://www.redrover.org/node/1378

Disease specific                      http://www.redrover.org/node/1379

Breed specific                         http://www.redrover.org/node/1380

For basic care                         http://www.redrover.org/node/1382

http://www.angelhanzla.blogspot.com/p/resources-for-pets-medical-assistance.html

From the Animal Protection League of New Jersey:  http://www.aplnj.org/assets/pdf/VBAP_Other_Organizations.pdf

From Banfield Charitable Trust:  http://www.banfieldcharitabletrust.org/home/assistance-programs/

Some vet care assistance is available to low income, elderly and disabled pet owners through local helping organization,  Sam’s Hope .   http://www.samshope.org

For the Love of Alex, in Telford PA, helps to fund life-saving medical care for pets.   http://www.fortheloveofalex.org       email: info@fortheloveofalex.org

United Paw, a campaign of the Crossings Animal Sanctuary in Bucks County PA, has the Boris and Natasha Fund to help with the cost of life-sustaining vet care for families in financial distress.

The Dollar Club is pooling little contributions ($1.) from many people to help pets in need.   http://www.thedollarclub.org/index.html

The Six Legs Foundation helps to raise funds for veterinary care, so pets can stay with their families.  https://www.facebook.com/6legs

The Mr.Mo Project primarily saves old, sick dogs from kill shelters, but they also help people who are facing the possibility of surrendering their sick senior dog when they cannot afford the care costs.   http://www.mrmoproject.com/get-and-give-help-for-senior-shelter-dogs/#anchor.

Not local but good to know of – The Doney Clinic – This volunteer run and donation funded clinic provides veterinary care to the pets of homeless and qualifying low income people in the Seattle area.    http://doneyclinic.org/index.html   http://doneyclinic.org/interest-stories.html

CareCredit is sometimes suggested as a way to manage a large veterinary bill.  The New

York Times presents some issues to be aware of when using this payment option.

How Veterinarians Help Predatory Lenders

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2010/08/31/129548644/how-veterinarians-help-predatory-lenders

You might also want to read the Comments, to deepen your perspective on this matter:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/storyComments.php?storyId=129548644&pageNum=1

Prince Chunk Foundation  

8/2014 – The foundation has been undergoing a long term restructuring and may not yet be offering assistance to petowners.  Please check the website.     http://www.princechunkfoundation.org/index.php

The Prince Chunk Foundation will enable pet owners to keep their pets during times of financial

crisis by providing temporary assistance such as free emergency veterinary care and free pet

food to low income pet owners, so they never have to choose between caring for themselves and

caring for their pets.   Initially, the Prince Chunk

Foundation will assist dogs and cats.  It will begin operating in New York, Pennsylvania, New

Jersey, and California. Prince Chunk is a large cat who lost his home in August 2008, when his

owner’s home was being foreclosed and he was abandoned on the street.  He was lucky enough

to find a loving home.

Willow

Willow is a cat who was born with deformed legs.  Luck eventually smiled upon her and she found a wonderful home and got help and support through many social network friends.  One of the things that Willow’s Facebook page does is post the stories of other cats who are in need of assistance.  If you are looking for help with you cat’s medical costs, it might be worthwhile to contact Willow’s page.  http://www.facebook.com/prettywillow?sk=wall

New  Banfield  Pilot  Grant   (10/2011)

According to Wikipedia, one of the earliest uses of Time Banking was in the field of senior care.  Now there is a new innovation on the theme of “service exchange” and pet care.  The Banfield Charitable Trust has a new pilot initiative (at a few selected sites) – Ella’s Fund – where low income pet owners get veterinary care for their pet in exchange for volunteer work, preferably by a teenage  family member.   http://www.banfieldcharitabletrust.org/programs/pet-advocacy-grants/grant-to-colorado-state/

5 Comments leave one →
  1. August 3, 2013 6:12 pm

    Hello, I wish for to subscribe for this website to get most recent updates, so where can i do
    it please assist.

    • November 25, 2013 5:13 pm

      Thanks for your question, Philip !
      According to WordPress support, there should be a ‘Follow’ button on the Philly Pets and Seniors site. If you are logged into WordPress, the Follow button should appear on the top admin bar. If you are not logged in, the Follow button is on the bottom right corner of the site.
      Hope this works.

  2. January 11, 2014 2:40 pm

    Thank you for posting this wonderful blog! This information can be very helpfull for those who really need financial assistance. Those organization are doing a blessed job!

    Click Here

  3. Stewart Cohen permalink
    October 13, 2014 8:48 pm

    Do you offer low cost vet treatment? My 10 yo cat has been excessively drooling. She walks around with her tongue hanging outm

    • October 15, 2014 7:46 pm

      No, Philly Pets and Seniors is an informational resource only. Have you looked at the clinics listed under the Low Cost vet care section of the site ? Their prices are lower than the typical vet. Your kitty might need attention. I’ve heard some pet owners say they paid for vet care through Care Credit. Once you know what help your cat needs, you could try applying for assistance through some of the organizations listed Financial Assistance with Veterinary Care. Wishing you and your kitty good luck.  

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